Many Greens Acrylic Painting

Here is a painting I created of a scene along the St Lawrence River.

There is an Island and trees, and many shades of green. This painting is small, and measures 16″x12″

The first step in creating this painting was getting an adequete photo of the many shades of greens in the trees.

I took the 2 photos below while visiting a cabin with my parents in 2019.

The image below is a version of the scene done in Faber Castel Pitt Pastels, which are hard pastel drawing pencils.

The next image is an experimental watercolour version of the painting I created before doing the acrylic version.

The first step of the painting was creating a drawing and then transfering it to the canvas by putting graphite on the back of the paper, and pressing into the lines of the drawing on the canvas.

The next part was starting the painting process. This photo was taken after working on the painting for 4.5 hours.

Here is the finished painting. The painting was finished after 11 hours of work, over a few months.

One thing I really like about this painting is how the depth in the trees turned out. I used many glazes, and really feel that I created a 3D effect while painting them. Also I added some, golden orange, ultra marine blue and cobalt blue to the sky and water, and really think that it created a neat effect.

5 thoughts on “Many Greens Acrylic Painting

  1. A difficult subject to carry off Shawn. I like the use of the red in the watercolour and pastels. Perhaps this with a reduction in tone of the background trees in the acrylic paintings – to enhance the illusion of depth.

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